The Frank Thorne Interview

CW: This post contains explicit, drawn pornographic images. In this conversation from The Comics Journal #280 (January 2007), Frank Thorne talks about a cartooning career that ultimately spanned more than 60 years. He worked in genres such as SF, sword and sorcery and history on comic books and strips — most notably, on Marvel’s Red Sonja title — before following his bliss.

Al Jaffee At 99

Recently retired at the age of 99, Gary Groth catches up with Al Jaffee on his career, his comics, and the things he left behind.

Rationality and Relevance: Dennis O’Neil

This interview was conducted in 1978 and 1980 and released in full form in The Comic Journal #66 (September 1981). Among the many topics they cover, young Gary Groth and Mike Catron ask Denny O’Neil about the potential for the art form – specifically, beyond the mass audience and the superhero genre – and talk about a promising new writer O’Neil is editing, Frank Miller.

Art In Quarantine: Gary Groth

“I’ve been doing this for forty-four years and we’ve gone through some really, you know, bizarre times, terrible times and I’ve never experienced something quite like this before.”

Gary Groth Interviews Gahan Wilson

Check out this 2011 conversation between cartoonist Gahan Wilson and Fantagraphics publisher and Comics Journal Editor-In-Chief Gary Groth, which originally appeared in the Fantagraphics collection of Wilson’s Playboy cartoons.

Gary Groth on Bill Schelly

I don’t remember when I met Bill Schelly, but it may have been as late as 2006, when he pitched the idea of a Joe Kubert biography to me. It may have been earlier—and we may have corresponded briefly in the 1970s, as two teen-age comics fans putting out fanzines—but if we did, it would’ve… Read more »

Comics Journal #303: The Tomi Ungerer Interview (Excerpt)

The prolific Ungerer has been an artistic force of nature for more than 60 years — a cartoonist of international repute, a best-selling children’s book author, a painter, a prose writer, a sculptor, and a political dissident. In this excerpt, he talks about the relationship between writing and drawing.

Stan Lee, in Brief

Who —or what— was Stan Lee? Editor, hustler, hatchet man, corporate player, shill, writer, frustrated novelist, success, failure, catalyst, front man, self-parody, hack, exploiter, innovator.