Author Archives: Ken Parille

About Ken Parille

Ken Parille is an Associate Professor of English at East Carolina University. His writing has appeared in The Best American Comics Criticism, Children's Literature, Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature, Papers on Language and Literature, The Boston Review, Comic Art, Children's Literature Association Quarterly, and The Believer. He has also published a guitar instructional book as well as a number of instructional articles in GuitarOne magazine. His monograph Boys at Home: Discipline, Masculinity, and ‘The Boy-Problem’ in Nineteenth-Century American Literature was published by the University of Tennessee Press, and , along with Isaac Cates, he edited Daniel Clowes: Conversations.

Everything Sells Everything

A Not-So-Secret History of Superman, Wonder Woman, and the American Superhero. Continue reading

 

Leslie Stein: A Brief Appreciation

Leslie Stein makes great comics! Continue reading

 

Lichtenstein and the Art of Letters     

Roy Lichtenstein is one of the twentieth-century’s most important artists. He’s far from one of its best letterers. Continue reading

 

Gag Cartoons with Naked People: Abner Dean’s What Am I Doing Here?

Revisiting the “Brave Nude World” of philosopher, psychologist, psychiatrist, anthropologist, and cartoonist Abner Dean. Continue reading

 

Error Report?: Comics, Text, and Editing

Words, punctuation, and “orthographic consistency” on the comics page: theories and practices. Continue reading

 

Comics Criticism: Seven Hot Takes for Summer 2016

She tweeted that “comics criticism is trash and must be destroyed.” Does “comics” agree? In this episode, Grid veers away from comics boosterism (and moves perilously close to parody) as we search for answers. That, and Frank Cho’s unmentionables. Continue reading

 

Lulu Hitchcock Apocrypha!

Tim Hensley’s astonishing Sir Alfred #3, in which Alfred Hitchcock becomes what he already was: a comic-strip character. Continue reading

 

Black Panther #1: 31 Thoughts

Perhaps the critic had unrealistic expectations. Continue reading