Tag Archives: Highlights from the Archive

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Take Five: An Interview with Arnold Roth

In this 1991 interview, Gary Groth talks to Arnold Roth about jazz, Humbug, Harvey Kurtzman, the Senate hearings, Poor Arnold’s Almanac, National Lampoon, and more. Continue reading

 
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Blood and Thunder: The Complete “I Am Not Terry Beatty’s Girlfriend” Debate

In a classic example of authors responding to their critics circa 1988, Terry Beatty and his girlfriend Wendi Lee refute a negative review of Wild Dog in this series of letters from TCJ’s Blood and Thunder. An “I am not Terry Beatty’s Girlfriend” letter-writing contest ensues. Continue reading

 
Sequence from Will Eisner's January 15, 1950  The Spirit  "Bring in Sand Saref"

One Picture Does Not A Comic Make

In his review of Masters of Comic Book Art from The Comics Journal #49 (August 1979), Kim Thompson makes a distinction between illustration and sequential comic art. Continue reading

 
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Another Relentlessly Elitist Editorial

Kim Thompson answers a “silly question” in this editorial from The Comics Journal #55 (April 1980) Continue reading

 
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Claire Bretécher: Triumphant Despite Traitorous Translation

In this review from The Comics Journal #42 (October 1978), Kim Thompson critiques National Lampoon’s Claire Bretecher translation. Continue reading

 
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Run of the Miller

In this review from The Comics Journal #82 (July 1983) Kim Thompson reads and reacts to the first issue of Ronin. Continue reading

 
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Blood and Thunder: Craft is the Enemy

This argument began with a letter by James Kochalka (American Elf) in The Comics Journal #189 (in 2005, he would expand on his theory in The Cute Manifesto). Some readers found this letter inspirational; others, such as Jim Woodring, wrote in refutations. Continue reading

 
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The Rick Veitch Interview

Rick Veitch’s career spans from the underground to the self-publishing movements. Jeremy Pinkham talks to him about being in the first class at the Joe Kubert school, working on Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, and his personal take on the superhero genre. Continue reading