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Today, Rob Clough reviews Dan Zettwoch’s long-awaited Birdseye Bristoe (which we previewed back in May). Here’s an excerpt:

It’s telling that Dan Zettwoch’s full-length solo debut, Birdseye Bristoe, is touted on the cover as “An Inventions and How-To Book.” He’s never been an artist whose stories are driven by narrative. Instead, he likes to show his audience schematics, maps, instruction sheets, and cut-away drawings that nonetheless reveal something about the people who are building them. What’s odd about this book is that there is a narrative, but it’s almost entirely buried in an avalanche of diagrams that doubles as a tour of the non-town in which the story is set. If a reader is careful, he is provided with every clue as to what is happening and why, but Zettwoch gives nothing away for free, so to speak. As a result, it took me a couple of reads to figure out what was going on, beyond a simple collection of the usual clever Zettwoch drawings.

Elsewhere:

—Tom Spurgeon alerted the internet yesterday to Dylan Williams’s recently posted Comics Art interview with Fred Guardineer (which includes excerpts from Guardineer’s diary comics). I am grateful not only for seeing this material again, but also for being reminded of that Williams tribute site in general, which I had somehow lost track of, but is packed with excellent stuff, and well worth exploring.

—A lawyer named Bob Kohn opposed to the proposed Apple/e-books anti-trust settlement has recently filed an amicus brief explaining why, and done so in the form of a five-page comic. You can read that brief, and Kohn’s story, here. I’m not sure I buy Kohn’s reasons for doing this in comics form. He says he was asked to boil down a twenty-five-page prose argument to five pages, and couldn’t see a way to get enough information in to five pages, but comics form helped, because pictures “tell a thousand words.” Of course, nearly every one of the pictures he actually used is just one person sitting next to another, talking, so I’m not sure what information was being added visually here. But considering that the New York Times and Bloomberg have already reported on this, passed along his argument, and made his story go semi-viral, Kohn may have a larger point on comics’ effectiveness. I doubt as many people would have read a more conventional brief.

—Danny Best has exhumed John Byrne’s infamous courtroom testimony in the late-’90s Marvel vs. Marv Wolfman suit over Blade.


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