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G-g-g-g-ghosts

Today, John Kelly is back with another guest Riff Raff column. This week, he reports from Art Spiegelman and Françoise Mouly's RAW discussion at CXC. He also contacted Jay Lynch to talk about the lost Lynch painting recently discovered on Roadside Antiques.

Lynch says that while he was a student at the Art Institute in the mid-'60s, there was a billboard across the street from the school that advertised the political campaign for a local sheriff. "It showed this guy and his wife and like eight kids. And the kids were holding a sign that said 'Woods For Sheriff' and you could see the billboard outside the window of the art class. So I painted it. But then I got carried away. I was just trying to kill time really, and I painted it for months. After a while you put it up in front of the class and the teacher critiques it. And so the teacher says, 'Well, what were you thinking when you did this?' And I gave this sort of long-winded speech about when certain things affect the brain it allows you to see the plasticity of your environment, blah, blah. After I got done with that, he said, 'Oh thank God. I thought you were taking LSD or something' and that got a big laugh."

Meanwhile, elsewhere:

—Reviews & Commentary. At the Paris Review, Folio Club founding editor Robert Pranzatelli profiles the career of Moebius.

At Comics Tavern, Jon Vinson writes about Yoshihiro Tatsumi's Midnight Fishermen, the collection of his stories not published by Drawn & Quarterly.

Douglas Wolk reviews various books for the New York Times, including titles by Jason and Kate Beaton.

—Interviews & Profiles. Lorenzo Mattotti briefly discusses his latest New Yorker cover and the Syrian refugee crisis with Françoise Mouly.

Alex Deuben talks to Jessica Abel.

Derf Backderf was a guest on Gil Roth's Virtual Memories podcast.

—News. The winners of the Joe Shuster Awards have been announced.

—Misc. David Boswell:


One Response to G-g-g-g-ghosts

  1. Dylan says:

    Advisory to anyone in/near Minneapolis: The original pages of “Being Bag,” a 1966 precursor to underground comics produced by members of the Drop City artists collective, are now on display at the Walker Art Center as part of the exhibition, “Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia.” The pencil-and-crayon on paper, color originals look a million times better than these scans of the black-and-white printed version: https://www.scribd.com/doc/120317407/The-Being-Bag
    Included are all pages of issue no. 1, plus the first page of never-finished issue no. 2.
    Clark Richert told me they would drive into the nearest town to pick up the latest Marvel comics, and they were totally into Ditko-era “Dr. Strange.” Groovy.

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