REVIEWS

These Savage Shores

These Savage Shores begins in southwestern India in the 1760s, during the Anglo-Mysore wars, a time when the corruptive influence and absolute power of the British Crown and its corporate bloodsuckers, The East India Company, was corrupting absolutely. Into this … Continue reading

 

Silver Surfer: Black

There are two main things of interest in Silver Surfer: Black, and the first of them is Tradd Moore. I came across his work first in The New World, the miniseries he co-created with Aleš Kot for Image. It’s art … Continue reading

 

Frogcatchers

It often seems unfair that an artist’s year(s)-long labour can be read in a disproportionally short span of time. I cannot say how long or short artistic appreciation should take, but I can say that when Jeff Lemire is the … Continue reading

 

Bradley of Him

Connor Willumsen’s 2017 book Anti-Gone announced to all in no uncertain terms what those who’d been paying attention had known for a while: his audience sits in the presence of brilliance. What was so thrilling about that book, the immediate predecessor to the … Continue reading

 

Taxi! Stories from the Back Seat

Taxi! is a short graphic novel about four cab rides taken by Holland-based cartoonist and animator Aimée de Jongh over the last six years: from her then-home in Los Angeles to LAX to pick up a friend (2014); from Jakarta’s … Continue reading

 

Cub

Is it okay for a comic book to be readable and not much more? Sure. As with any other art form, there’s a big fat bell curve that describes quality, with some garbage and some cream at opposite ends, and … Continue reading

 

No Longer Human

On page 377-380 of Junji Ito’s 2017 adaptation of Osamu Dazai’s No Longer Human (1948) the protagonist Yozo Oba, after another suicide attempt, narrates: The fourth misfortune [of his “ten misfortunes”] was woman. Human women. More than difficult, these incomprehensible, … Continue reading

 

Old Masters: A Comedy

The murky and most of the time unnecessary business of turning a novel into a graphic novel works best if the relationship between the original and the adaptation is neither distant nor faithful, but both, as is the case in … Continue reading