REVIEWS

Roughneck

From the local and particular to the grandiose and universal Jeff Lemire easily and expertly guides the reader through life as experienced in the lonely Northern Ontario outback. The fictional town of Pimitamon near Timmins, Ontario acts as a natural … Continue reading

 

Libby’s Dad

Fear of the familiar takes center stage in a new short work from Eleanor Davis, whose 2014 Fantagraphics entry How to Be Happy stunned with its juxtaposition of overwhelming, deliberate color and discordant emotional ambiguity. Libby’s Dad, a short story … Continue reading

 

The Best We Could Do

Artist Thi Bui’s powerful and poignant graphic memoir is a family saga that probes her family’s history, including their escape from war-torn Vietnam to America in the late 1970’s, to their lives in the present day. Continue reading

 

Turkish Trilogy

Fortunately, laughing out loud – even talking loudly to yourself – is not frowned upon in Berkeley cafes. (Indeed, frowning upon someone, no matter how offensive and high-decibel his ravings, is so eschewed, you would think it would have frowners … Continue reading

 
Dick Tracy Colorful Cases of the 1930s

Dick Tracy: Colorful Cases of the 1930s

The stunning new collection from the esteemed Sunday Press, Dick Tracy: Colorful Cases of the 1930s, explores Gould’s first decade of four-color powder burn nightmares. Continue reading

 

Dick Tracy: Colorful Cases of the 1930s

Peter Maresca’s books celebrate what I call the art of looking. Their generous page size and crisp full-color presentation invite us to regard comics as more than a diversion—something to vacuum down in between checking Facebook and binge-watching Westworld. Via … Continue reading

 

Soft City

Pushwagner, born Terje Brofe, had an irregular life, preoccupied with bohemianism, we are told in the afterword of the book. Upon first reading Pushwagner’s Soft City, originally drawn between 1969 and 1975,  I am struck by the boundlessness of its … Continue reading

 

Spanish Fever

A new anthology dedicated to introducing a wide range of Spanish alternative cartoonists to American audiences. Continue reading