REVIEWS

Memorabilia

Sergio Ponchione is an Italian cartoonist who first made his mark with American audiences with his series Grotesque, for the now defunct Ignatz line. That was a collaboration between Fantagraphics and Igort’s Coconino Press, and it gave both American and … Continue reading

 

That Box We Sit On

That Box We Sit On from Richie Pope is the kind of comic you push, hard. Perhaps that’s why voters at the 2018 Small Press Expo named Pope the winner of the Ignatz award for Outstanding Artist. The democratic process … Continue reading

 

Dokudami Tenement Volume Three : Confessions Of A Transgender (Killing Me Softly)

As a general rule of thumb, Manga doesn’t concern itself with issues pertaining to working-class or poor people all that often, but one of the notable exceptions to that rule was the late Takashi Fukutani’s long-running Dokudami Tenement, which was … Continue reading

 

Tinderella

The most interesting thing about Tinderella is its sudden and sharp shift in tone about two thirds of the way through. Prior to that moment, the book appeared to be an entertaining if rather familiar look at the trials and … Continue reading

 

Part of It: Comics and Confessions

Autobio comics trick you into having empathy. When we read comics, we articulate voices and imagine their utterance, and on some level I think we convince ourselves we understand the emergence of thoughts and feelings onto the page. In autobio, … Continue reading

 

The Mouse Glass

For Germany’s leading cartoonist Anna Haifisch the fluorescent honeymoon between To Live and Die in L.A. and Miami Vice is definitely over. Her latest release The Mouse Glass is implementing a further decisive step in her constantly evolving chromatic ideology. … Continue reading

 

Hieronymus & Bosch

Paul Kirchner’s Hieronymus & Bosch collects over eighty comic strips that riff on the afterlife of a “shameless ne’er-do-well named Hieronymus” and his faithful wooden toy duck, Bosch. The hapless pair are trapped in Hell, the primary setting for most of … Continue reading

 

Bloodstrike: Brutalists

I hesitated when offered the chance to review Michel Fiffe’s Bloodstrike: Brutalists. For one, I worried my lack of familiarity with the finer points of the original Bloodstrike’s continuity left me unqualified to comment on how well ties together loose … Continue reading