REVIEWS

Drawn to Berlin

Drawn to Berlin is Ali Fitzgerald’s first book-length comic. As a drawing instructor at one of Berlin’s bubble shelters during the height of the 2015 European refugee crisis, the social power of images is one of her central concerns. From … Continue reading

 

The Replacer

The Replacer is a comic book – or as Aftershock’s bureau of public relation affairs calls it, a “64-Page Graphic Novella” – that deeply immerses the reader into the daily affairs evolving around a medical patient’s history proceeding from a … Continue reading

 

I, René Tardi, Prisoner of War in Stalag IIB Vol. 2: My Return Home

One of this year’s best graphic novels is this second volume adapting the memoirs of René Tardi, who kept copious notes of his capture and internment by German soldiers during the Second World War. The elder Tardi’s notes, sketches, and … Continue reading

 

Gender Queer

Something about being non-binary which you might not really get unless you are, in fact, also non-binary: there’s not just one way to be non-binary, but as many different ways to be non-binary as there are non-binary people. Other than … Continue reading

 

Comics: Easy As ABC!

Reading was a constant struggle for me during elementary school, due to dyslexia. The one thing that saved me was drawing. I loved to draw and I loved comics. Every Sunday I would try to read the comics section of … Continue reading

 

PTSD

Guillaume Singelin is a young, accomplished French cartoonist, but his work has had a relatively limited release in the United States. Peow! Studio put out a collection of his sketches titled Junky as a part of a Kickstarter campaign a … Continue reading

 

The Freak

There was an odd digression in a recent article about an artificial-intelligence algorithm generating images to stimulate the part of a monkey’s brain used to recognise faces. “Visual neurons, it seems, like exaggeration,” it read. “In previous studies, [the scientist’s] … Continue reading

 

Vision Part 1

In tight, thin lines that fill nine-panel grids, Julia Gfrörer’s comics explore the realms of horror and the erotic lives of women and finds, in the intersection of the two, a new sort of agency that borders on empowerment but … Continue reading