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Framed!Framed!

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The Minicomix Revolution Will Not Be Televised

The revolution will not be televised The revolution will not be brought to you by Xerox – Gil Scott-Heron, The Revolution Will Not Be Televised (1970) The humble, photocopied minicomic sprang into being in the early 1970s and has become a prime … Continue reading

 
Garrett Price White Boy

The White Boy Trilogy and Garrett Price, Part 1

Garrett Price’s White Boy, a vividly original comic strip set in the American West, appeared on the scene in 1933, shapeshifted three times in three years, and then faded into obscurity faster than a wind-blown smoke signal. Since then, a few slim sheaves of … Continue reading

 
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20 Comic Favorites of 2015

Paul Tumey’s top of the heap. Continue reading

 
Bezango. WA a film about Pacific Northwest Cartoonists by Ron Austin and Louise Amandes

Bezango, WA: An Interview with Filmmakers Louise Amandes and Ron Austin

Back in 2011, two documentarians set out to make a movie about artists in the Pacific Northwest who make comics. They thought they were making a simple film about a beloved subject and then discovered they were in the middle of a cultural surge. Continue reading

 
Pushing the Limits: Comics That Stretch The Form by Paul Tumey

Pushing the Limits: Comics and Creators That Stretch the Form

Comics as a self-aware form. Continue reading

 
Clare Victor Dwiggins by Paul Tumey

Dead Cats at Moonlight – The Art of Clare Victor “Dwig” Dwiggins

A documentary about the forgotten comics of early 20th century childhood. Continue reading

 
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A Walk Through Yuichi Yokoyama’s GARDEN with Tom Van Deusen

Seattle cartoonist Tom Van Deusen and I recently sat down and had a focused discussion about Garden, the 300-page comic book by Tokyo painter and manga artist Yuichi Yokoyama that was published in 2011 by PictureBox. The conversation helps reveal the … Continue reading

 
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Creeping Death and Snake Meat: Basil Wolverton and Max Clotfelter

Who knew, or could ever have imagined, that Basil Wolverton, perpetrator of some of the weirdest and most grotesque eyeball kicks in mid-century American pop culture, once made a serious and concentrated effort to draw Mickey Mouse comics for Walt Disney? Continue reading