FEATURES

“One Thing Leads to Another”: An Interview with Kevin Huizenga

“I don’t think about it in that way. At this point, that’s the way that I draw and the way that I write. It’s not a choice. It’s just the way I do it.” Continue reading

 

Dylan Edwards: Day Four

Are you ready to get spit on? Because if you’re not, you might be in the wrong room. Dylan has the deets! Continue reading

 

Dylan Edwards: Day Three

Another day, another Cartoonist’s Diary entry, another opportunity to potentially frustrate the locals with tourist-style mishaps! Continue reading

 

Hamburg’s Comicfestival 2019

Couldn’t make it to Germany for the boundary incinerating installment of Comicfestival? Never fear. Boots were on the ground, worn by Heike & Oliver, and they’re here to catch you up on everything you missed. And it’s a lot! Continue reading

 

Dylan Edwards: Day Two

Choreographed heavy metal crowd work: there’s more to translation than merely the spoken word. Dylan Edwards is ready to play catch-up, in today’s Cartoonist’s Diary! Continue reading

 

“All That Truly Matters In A Story Is Emotion”: An Interview with Mark Waid

Alex Dueben attempts to catch up with Mark Waid, one of the most prolific and successful comic writers of the last three decades, and while he can’t quite cover it all–they certainly cover a good bit of what has kept Waid’s creative fires burning on books like Archie, Daredevil, Superman: Birthright, Impulse and his latest, Ignited. Continue reading

 

Why Y’all Stuck on Laffy Taffy? (This Week’s Links)

In this week’s links, Ryan Flanders bemoans the Brooklyn youth of today; not their politics, not their art, not their choice of chain restaurants…but their lack of interest in Halloween costumes related to Russell Myers Broom-Hilda character. Continue reading

 

Raina Telgemeier Has Got Guts

Raina Telgemeier’s work may feature a child-protagonist and may be read by children, but her compositional complexity within and across her autobiographical graphic narratives is as thoughtful and nuanced as the comics medium permits. It’s not good because it’s popular: it’s popular because it really is that good. Continue reading