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Ketchup

Okay, still catching up a bit on links, so there’s plenty of reading here…

Sean T. Collins pops in today with a review of Brian Ralph’s post-apocalyptic Daybreak.

Emily Nilsson, Virginia Paine, and Tom Neely plan to continue Sparkplug Books.

Eddie Campbell on how to draw women’s feet the Frank Frazetta and Craig Thompson way.

Gary Groth talks to the L.A. Times‘s Geoff Boucher about the upcoming Carl Barks reprints.

Nicole Rudick interviews Kate Beaton for the online Paris Review.

Art Spiegelman is interviewed about future publishing technologies in regard his new MetaMaus by Brian Heater at Publishers Weekly.

And Jeet Heer and Dwight Garner have both written reviews of the project.

Milo George points out a fun old Lynda Barry interview on YouTube.

I don’t think Dan posted this last week, but if he did, no harm done repeating it, I guess: Inkstuds has gone video, and Brandon Graham is the first guest.

James Jarvis (of De Profundis) is doing a guest blog at PictureBox this week.

If I told you that a fan had recently been arrested for attempting to reenact scenes from a comic book, would you immediately think I must mean Chester Brown’s Paying for It?

I think I got this from Abhay Khosla: A good discussion of Hergé’s drawing techniques is on Quora.

 

Old and New Stars

First up:

On the site today is Kim Deitch’s remembrance of the cartoonist and historian Roger Brand. I’ve been nagging Kim for months to do this and I’m thrilled with the results. The social history of underground comics — or hell, most all of comics — is not so well attended to, and Kim’s going a ways towards remedying that as best he can.

Elsewhere:

Uhhh, this is sort of amazing. Someone at MTV decided to start a web site dedicated to its old Liquid Television animation anthology and garnish it with other oddball projects from the channel. Why does this matter, because now you can watch Richard Sala’s Invisible Hands; Mark Beyer’s The Adventures of Thomas and Nardo; and Charles Burns’ Dogboy. Plus we get Aeon Flux (at last) and The Maxx. And Wonder Showzen. Jeez. It’s rather amazing. I would guess it’s a sort of “hey we did this, too” response to Adult Swim? But who knows…

What else, let’s see:

-Here’s a report on the talk I did with Dan Clowes and Adrian Tomine. Not reported on in this piece: My incredible good looks and quick wits.

-Joe Simon turned 98 and the Washington Post interviewed him.

-I’m glad Tom’s thinking about this so we don’t have to.

-Here’s a series of posts on the fiction career of the late historian Bill Blackbeard (via BK).

-And finally, TCJ contributor Mike Dawson is interviewed on his own show about his new book Troop 142.

 

Oh Boy

Back from vacation at last. Thanks to Dan for filling in for me. There are about a million online links I need to post while I’m catching up, so please bear with me while I get back to speed (and forgive me if I should have credited you for finding the link–in my attempts to catch up, I know I’ve accidentally lost track of a few sources.)

Joe McCulloch is here this morning, too, of course, with his regular roundup of the most interesting looking comics products being offered for sale this week.

Elsewhere:

1. Eddie Campbell writes about Craig Thompson’s long-awaited Habibi, and briefly responds to Nadim Damluji’s take on Thompson’s usage of Orientalist tropes. (We are preparing our own coverage of Habibi now, and should have something on the book up soon.)

2. The recent Boswell to Alan Moore’s Johnson, Pádraig Ó Méalóid, gets a revealing and lengthy interview out of Kevin O’Neill, mostly focused on his and Moore’s League of Extraordinary Gentlemen series.

3. The art auctions to benefit Dylan Williams’s family continue at Profanity Hill and The Divine Invasion, with new material being added all the time.

4. Ruth Franklin at The New Republic reviews Art Spiegelman’s MetaMaus, his new book/DVD-ROM.

5. Vanessa Davis drew a Yom Kippur strip for Tablet.

6. Presented without comment: Rob Liefeld gives advice on how to deal with “haters.”

7. Am I the only who didn’t know they were making a film version of Tatsumi’s Drifting Life?

8. HiloBrow’s Joshua Glenn hands off the entire new 52-title DC lineup to an 11-year-old named Max to review. At Grantland, an adult named Alex Pappademas attempts the same feat.

9. Bob Temuka appreciates the latest issue of Love and Rockets.

10. If you only read one of the many Maurice Sendak interviews I have linked to over the last few weeks, this is a good one to pick.

 

Getting Biblical

On the site:

-We are thrilled to have a conversation between Jay Ruttenberg and Drew Friedman. Drew you’ve heard of, but Jay is one of our most favorite writer/editors in the biz. His Lowbrow Reader is the killer zine about comedy to end all killer zines about comedy.

-Yesterday ol man Frank Santoro got “Biblical” on the subject of superhero comics, and continuing his “scene report” series, has Ian Harker chiming in on the Philly scene.

And elsewhere, slim pickins in the run-up to NYCC this weekend:

-C.F. is interviewed at Heavy Mental.

-Tom Spurgeon interviews Mark Sable.

-Via Flog, a compilation of Jack Davis TV commercials.

See you soon.

 

 

Going Faster

Well, it’s Friday and perhaps Tim is wrapping up his vacation in an undisclosed comics-free location. Me, I’m editing two enormo interviews for this site, both of which I think you’ll be very excited about. And so, friends, enjoy these links today, catch up one the avalanche content you may have missed this last week or so (like Moynihan, Deitch, Piskor, Fischer, McCulloch, Metaphrog, Ryan, Latour) and dig the links below.

Charles Brownstein takes us through what the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund is and does. (via)

Heidi MacDonald points out that longtime indie distro stalwart Tony Shenton is one of the very the last indie distributors standing, now that the brief-lived Haven Distribution has closed. Tom Spurgeon has some good analytical thoughts on the matter. Tony has been hugely supportive of me for over a decade now. He really is one of a kind. Stores: Give this man some love. He’s IT.

Jeff Newelt has posted a killer list of his best comics for the last (Jewish) year, my own precious 1-800-MICE among them, but more importantly to you, dear reader, he highlights some overlooked gems, like Leslie Stein‘s hilarious, beautifully drawn, and beloved-by-TCJ Eye of the Majestic Creature, TCJ-contributor Michael Fiffe‘s Zegas, and the still resounding tome from Brecht Evens, Wrong Place.

Well, as usual, D&Q’s Tom Devlin had more fun at a show than I did (but that’s only because he LOVES comics in a way I might refer to as “unmanly”), and then rubs my face in it with a funny APE report in which he captures my grimacing vissage. Fantagraphics’ Eric Reynolds posted a more subdued rundown, remembering those he missed, and me, I’ll probably get to mine sometime next year. Sigh.

Oh man, there’s an animated version of Batman: Year One that looks like they turned Miller and Mazzucchelli’s work into a storyboard and then grafted the ugliest possible animation and voices on top of it. Score another one for the great minds at Warners. (via FS)

And here’s an interview with cartoonist Gabby Schulz over at Fully Engaged Feminism.

Finally, I think this is new: An easy-to-use “Is it still under copyright” digital finder. Quick, start your own “archival” publishing company!

 

Some Water

On the site today:

Michel Fiffe interviews Jason Latour on art, commerce, and working for Marvel. I enjoy Latour’s art, and Fiffe has some good thoughts on the work and his own relationship to it. Check it out.

Elsewhere:

Did you hear the one about a box of Storeyvilles? I did, and now you will. Copacetic Comics has a box of the original printing of Frank Santoro’s Storeyville in stock now, complete with an awesome run down on it. This is a must-have for the impossible-to-replicate printing alone, and I thought so long before I ever knew Frank.

The second issue of my favorite new anthology, Thickness, is now for sale online.

Jim Rugg has some words on Sam Kieth. I also have a real fondness for his utterly gnarly drawing style.

Jon Lewis gives us humans a new True Swamp.

In art news, Gary Panter is opening a show of paintings tonight at Fredericks and Freiser in NYC. And next week Seth is opening “The Great Brotherhood of Canadian Cartoonists” at Adam Baumgold Gallery, and you can head over to the web site now and take a gander. That is one handsome exhibition poster.

 

Vidz

You’ll be relieved to know I’m back in Brooklyn safe and sound. Today on the site:

Rob Clough writes about the output of Michael DeForge in the context of expectations and youth:

One of the reasons why I like DeForge is, like Shaw, he is an artist who just does the work. Whatever doubts he has about his own abilities or place in the world of comics doesn’t stop him from drawing story after story. He’s the engine behind any number of exciting anthologies, for example.

Elsewhere:

Hey, Inkstuds is releasing videos. And starting with Brandon Graham. Excellent.

Sorta comics-related but at least timely: I always like to see what PFFR the team behind Wonder Showzen and Xavier: Renegade Angel, is up to, and here’s a good thing they did. Via FS.

In Montreal Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly visit Drawn & Quarterly. It’s not yet confirmed if they tried poutine.

Paul Karasik would like you to know that he has a cartoon in The New Yorker. I like this quest of Paul’s.

Kim Thompson interviews himself about Marti’s The Cabbie. This is a handsome and vicious book.

Also not really comics, but related: Salon.com catches up with Nicholson Baker about the closing of the chain restaurant Friendly’s. This entire article reminds of me Dan Clowes’ Wilson, but for incredibly obvious reasons. I’m shallow, what can I say.

Stray thought: When I was interviewing Matthew Thurber at APE I glanced to the back of the room and saw Spain leading S. Clay Wilson through the back, in one door and out the other, shortcut style, and I thought to myself: “Those guys. THOSE GUYS”. The awe subsided and I went about my business of talking to Matthew. A couple days before that, Thurber and I visited Michael McMillan, the great cartoonist, sculptor, painter and man. McMillan told some good stories about George Kuchar and Rory Hayes and names long past, but also of current names, of watching movies with Griffith & Noomin, Deitch & Cruikshank, Bob & Aline, and a good anecdote about Marty Pahls’ porn collection. SF is kinda full of that history, and it floats around pretty casually, not like the more formal NYC. It’s good that way.

 

On the Run

Greetings.  Still on the road, post-APE.

Full link blogging and smart-ass remarks will resume Wednesday.

On the site today:

Kim Deitch takes us to the end of his musical road (for now). It’s been an honor having Kim with us and, best of all, he’ll continue to do some writing for TCJ in the coming months. If you have yet to dive in, now’s the time. All twelve installments are just a click away.

and of course Joe McCulloch captures the week in comics, which is, in this busy fall season, yet another big one.