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Moving Forward

Today, we bring you Michael Dean’s report on the Society of Illustration’s recent purchase of MoCCA. An excerpt:

Asked who approached whom, [MoCCA President Ellen] Abramowitz told the Journal, “They approached us about eight months ago just about shared memberships and things like that and we had a few friendly meetings. Then, our lease was coming due for renewal at the end of July. I thought, ‘MoCCA needs to go to the next level. If these are our goals and I don’t see them happening and I can’t do this with one person, do we really want to sign a new lease at this location?’ Our debt wasn’t high. What hurt us was we had rent. I called them [in late June] and proposed the transfer and they very quickly said yes. They agreed to everything we wanted and even things we didn’t ask for. Some [MoCCA] trustees were initially upset, but it was a unanimous vote by the board.”

And my wife forgot to buy new coffee yesterday, and I’m not about to try and address anything more complicated than that without caffeine.

Here are a few links:

—Tom Spurgeon is trying to start a conversation about crowdfunding, and Anne Hambrock compares Kickstarter to Indiegogo from a practical standpoint (without getting into the more controversial areas).

—Matt Madden drew a much-linked-to six-panel history of American comics to illustrate an essay on the same by academic Paul Lopes. The article is a more-or-less solid bit of history, though little of it will be new to Journal readers, and he makes a few questionable assertions (such as his claim that manga saved the American graphic novel in the 2000s).

—Cecil Adams at the Straight Dope tracked down the first person to use the letter “Z” to indicate snoring during sleep—it was a cartoonist, as you might expect, considering the fact that I’m mentioning it here. (via)

—Steven Heller briefly interviews Blab editor Monte Beauchamp.

—And Noah Van Sciver provides a “Directors Commentary” to the Forbidden Planet blog.

 

High Noon

Today on the site Craig Fischer returns to excellent column, Monsters Eat Critics, and an examination of Jonah Hex, which includes meditations on Westerns generally, plot structures and torture porn. Here’s a bit:

My biggest problem with All Star Western, however, is Gray and Palmiotti’s recalibration of the Western’s civilization/wilderness dialectic. In Hex #63, Jonah Hex is untamed, yet still bound by a personal code of honor, and he’s also the character we connect with the most. Hex appears in almost every scene of the comic; we are given access to his intimate memories of Aaron’s death, and we share his desire to stop Loco. I don’t think our identification with Hex is total; he brutally slits the throats of Loco’s men, he follows his father’s example by torturing Loco (and cutting out his eyes), and at moments like these some readers might put up some psychic barriers between Hex and their own emotions and sensibilities. We do have a strong sense of Hex’s status as a loner, however, and over the course of Gray and Palmiotti’s original series we come to know Hex as a character whose allegiances to both wilderness and civilization are mercurial and complex. Hex emulates the elegiac, conflicted gunslingers in earlier Western fiction and film, and Hex benefits from its dialogue with these predecessors.

And Rob Clough reviews Leela Corman’s graphic novel, Unterzakhn:

If there’s a villain to be found in Leela Corman’s return to comics, Unterzakhn, it’s hypocrisy. While this story of twin Jewish girls growing up in New York’s Lower East Side in the early 20th century is also about the art of survival and the arbitrary nature of what determines who lives and who dies, it’s really a celebration of human kindness in the face of the abyss and a condemnation of arbitrary, rules-based ethics systems. Corman jumps forward and back in time to tell the story of Esther and Fanya Feinberg, their father Isaac, and their mother Minna.

Elsewhere online:

One of my all-time favorite comic strips, Zissy and Rita, now has a web site featuring all their adventures. Zissy and Rita, how do I love thee? This is one of those hilarious masterpieces that scratches an itch (or a whole rash) that you didn’t know you had.

Illogical Volume has a post up on Mindless Ones about the recent Sean Rogers/Flex Mentallo piece over here.

Daniel Best has posted a fascinating article about Jerry Siegel’s life as an enlisted man in WWII.

And Tom Spurgeon has some thoughts on the late critic Robert Hughes.

 

 

 

Did I Miss Anything?

Looks like I picked a good week to go on vacation—have the last ten days been the most contentious in the site’s history during our tenure or does it just appear that way when you return only half-aware and see all the comments and cross-talk at once? (I don’t have enough patience or curiosity to find out whatever was going on on Twitter and Facebook a week ago, or I’m sure it would seem even more overwhelming.) Anyway, I didn’t have time to do much more than skim Dan’s post on SP7/Kickstarter shortly before my departure, and I spent my flight wondering what kind of reaction it might stir up. Now I know. On one level, the whole thing seems like a classic molehill-sized mountain, but the issues involved (and the discussion it spawned) deserve more than a day’s reflection before comment from me, especially considering just how much talk from other thinkers, both smart and dumb, has already been offered. Other than in the comments of this site (ha), some of the most even-keeled commentary on the controversy has come from Sean T. Collins, Secret Acres, and Tom Spurgeon. I will probably have more to say on this (and maybe on subsequent dustups on the site) in the near future, but those are good places to go in the meantime.

Other than that elephant in the room, the main topic of today is, of course, Joe McCulloch’s usual Tuesday column on the Week in Comics.

Link-wise, I’m a bit out of date, obviously, and will try not to be too redundant, but here’s what I’ve got for you so far:

—Drew Friedman recounts every kid’s dream, an adolescent visit to the offices of MAD magazine in 1974.

—Gary Groth talks to Chris Mautner at Robot 6 about this magazine’s recently announced partnership with Alexander Street Press.

—The University of Chicago has finally begun posting video of some of the panels from its acclaimed Hillary Chute-organized “Comics: Philosophy & Practice” conference. Links to the videos will be posted here, and so far include Art Spiegelman’s talk with the great academic W.J.T. Mitchell and a group panel featuring Aline Kominsky-Crumb, Justin Green, Carol Tyler, and Phoebe Gloeckner.

The Wall Street Journal has a report on the MoCCA/Society of Illustrators move.

—Leela Corman is interviewed at The Millions.

—Domingos Isabelhino writes on Marco Mendes.

Muddy Colors has video of the late, great Moebius drawing in 2010. (via)

 

Pants Optional

Welcome to the new week.

Today on the site:

The great Richard Gehr returns with a brand new Know Your New Yorker Cartoonist, this time featuring the most excellent Arnie Levin. Here’s a choice morsel:

GEHR: Did you have any relationship with your father?

LEVIN: When I went to get a passport, they ask me, “What’s your father’s name?” I said, “Ernest.” And the gal said to me, “No, it’s not.” I said, “Yes, it is!” She said, “No. That’s not what’s here.” So I called my mother and aunt to ask if Dad had any other names. Nothing. We were there all day calling people. I was getting desperate because we were gonna take a trip and I needed a passport. Then the gal asked me, “What borough did you live in?” I said the Bronx, She said no. I said, “This is impossible!” and asked her what she had down for his name. She said, “E.” [Laughter] I said, “E?” “Yes. E. Lawrence Levin.” She suddenly wants to get literary!

And of course, if you follow the site 24/7 you’d know that Frank Santoro posted a column yesterday detailing some of his current obsessions:

  currently obsessed with old issues of Optic Nerve. They look really really good and the stories hold up. The graphic design of the individual comics is great. And I really like Adrian’s “stage blocking” when he composes scenes. There is a very real sense of space in his comics. People in the landscape, in chairs, cars – all feel real and drawn and observed. Very hard to do without relying on photo refs. Tomine has a super developed sense of timing. I also like how he uses the “set” of the room or landscape to show physical as well as emotional distance from each other. Like a good cinematographer.

That should really quench your comics thirst, but if you’re like me, and you find yourself parched for comics, here’s a little more:

-Paul Gravett on comics history books.

-An entire Tumblr devoted to absurd images of Lupin III.

-Al Williamson and Joe Simon do a collaborative dance.

-A fine new Kate Beaton comic.

-More New Yorker cartooning: Bruce Eric Kaplan, who wrote the Seinfeld New Yorker cartoon bit, interviewed on that very subject.

-And not comics, but surely picture stories: The late Chris Marker once made a really excellent CD-ROM, which is now online. (via Jog)

 

 

 

It’s a Hit

Another week done gone, huh? And into the weekend for all of us. I’m feeling a little jaunty about it. But not to worry, Tucker Stone and co. are here to leave you with some feelings about the medium you love and cherish.

Elsewhere, the big, rumored-about news is that MoCCA has announced via press release that it will “transfer its assets” to the Society of Illustrators. This apparently includes “its permanent art collection and the MoCCA Fest name”. Also, from the PR:

The Society will continue and expand MoCCA’s mission in a number of ways: staging MoCCA Fest in its current location, dedicating a gallery in the Society building to MoCCA’s Permanent Collection, continuing MoCCA programming, and curating a special exhibition of works from MoCCA’s Permanent Collection in their Hall of Fame Gallery (on display March 5-May 4), which will run in conjunction with a major exhibit, “The Comic Art of Harvey Kurtzman,” curated by graphic designer and comics-anthology editor Monte Beauchamp. There will be extensive arts programming around both of these exhibits, including lectures, workshops, film and music series. Current MoCCA memberships will be honored at the Society of Illustrators.

I think it’s a bit of shame to place comics under the umbrella of illustration (though I love the latter), if only because it only just recently crawled out from under said umbrella and I prefer the medium stand on its own. Then again, as above, their histories are well intermingled, so a smart curator could do some interesting shows working deep in the Society stacks. I’ll be very curious how the Society handles comics, and also how it handles the current (very controversial) MoCCA board/staff. I’ll refrain from reading too much into the PR. We’ll have full coverage early next week.

And in other places online: It’s TCJ-contributors run amuck, writing for other publications like they haven’t a care in the world, throwing words hither and yon with great flair.

Here’s our Northern friend Jeet Heer on Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See for the LA Review of Books:

Mouly’s new collection Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See, documents the Brown era and beyond, and shows how she gave the public face of The New Yorker a make-over, turning out covers that are much livelier and more timely while also skirting at the edge of good taste, and occasionally getting reined in by the magazine’s governing code of propriety. What does a cultural agitator do when she’s put in charge of the covers of a venerable publication, one that, in recent decades, has had a tropism towards stuffiness? One predictable innovation was recruiting a cohort of artists from Raw, including Burns, Richard McGuire, Robert Crumb, and Jacques de Loustal. Eventually, Mouly also brought on a wider array of cartoonists from outside the Raw orbit, like Daniel Clowes, Adrian Tomine, and Seth. These artists brought the inventiveness and élan of contemporary narrative cartooning to The New Yorker.

Here’s that Tucker Stone again, co-opting Joe McCulloch (patron saint of the unreadable-yet-intriguing), Matt (handsome man) Seneca, and Chris (wise & stable) Mautner with their gold darned podcast.

Oh heavens, here’s Sean T. Collins telling you about Batman books for Rolling Stone!

And, beneath that handsome cover there will be some comics in this year’s Best American Comics. Here is a list of them.

Finally, despite my intense love for his work, I did not know that Seymour (my fantasy football league illustrator/designer of choice for my life) Chwast had a column over at Print. Now you know, too.

 

Up to the Majors

Well the internet has arrived to my dwelling here in Copake, New York. It’s a nice internet, though replete with strange angry vibes that my dog, Mr. Fatty Pants, wisely tells me to ignore. Fatty Pants says: “Hey man, just chill.” And so I do.

But my chilling should have no bearing on your comics reading habits.

Today on the site we have Ron Goulart continuing his correspondence column, this time with Basil Wolverton. If I haven’t mentioned this before, I should note that Ron is an absolute living treasure of a comics historian. He was the first to document and explain Jack Cole’s life and work, and his artist-centric approach to the medium has yielded numerous essential books, including both volumes of The Great Comic Book Artists, and my personal favorite, The Encyclopedia of American Comics. Anyhow, here’s a bit from Wolverton:

After Wolverton replied, I learned that he didn’t labor in the New York area but in the Pacific Northwest. He resided in Vancouver, Washington and contributed by mail. The Funnies, Inc. shop handled much of his comic book. His letterhead contained the bottom line “Producer of Preposterous Pictures of Peculiar People.” He sent me a small original drawing of Powerhouse, which I immediately tacked to my bedroom wall to add to my growing collection. In a later letter Wolverton enclosed a snapshot of himself holding his dog. He looked unlike Spacehawk or Powerhouse Pepper. But was a chubby fellow with curly hair. In the letter he explained, “the one with the coat is me.” He was always polite and helpful and upbeat.

And elsewhere online, a diverse selection of reading material with which to wile away your summer day…

Brokelyn talks to Leslie Stein, Lisa Hanawalt, and Brendan Leach about how they make a living (or don’t) in comics.

Howard Chaykin has resurrected his erotic comic book series, Black Kiss, and talks about it here. Chaykin is one of those artists I’m perpetually interested in, for the arc of his career as much as the work itself.

Sean Howe, whose forthcoming Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, is a miracle of research and storytelling, has a classic bit of correspondence from Steve Ditko.

Warren Ellis writes about British adventure comic strips. I’ve only just gotten on to Modesty Blaise, and am enjoying the strip a lot.

Michael Dooley’s two part interview with Susie Cagle, with a guest appearance by Ted Rall, is here and here.

And finally, not comics, but this is an excellent and stylistically diverse career in book cover design.

 

 

Liberation Now!

Well it’s a new day here. Tim is still on vacation, my internet situation remains iffy, but we must soldier on.

Though I’m not going to get into the comments on my little screed last week,  I want to take a minute (despite my better instincts) and clarify a couple things for the record. First, it should be evident that the piece references the use of Kickstarter for one particular project, which, to me, represents a species of projects, by one kind of entity. It was not covering Kickstarter in general, or individual artists using Kickstarter, etc.  I’m glad it lead to discussion, but I certainly wasn’t, as has been intimated, taking a position on Kickstarter in general. And second, I noticed some confusion about my role in the Brooklyn Comics and Graphics Festival vis-a-vis what I wrote. BCGF is run by three people. It is not dictated by my tastes. It’s run with the goal of making the best and most diverse festival possible, and in all cases the majority rules, not any one person’s ideas. And that’s it. Now on to important comic book business.

Today on the site we bring you Sean Rogers on Flex Mentallo and Grant Morrison’s writing tropes. Here’s a taste:

…So far, so good, right? Scope, complexity, ambition—all the hallmarks of a potentially expansive SF experience. But despite the abstract appeal of Morrison’s ideas and approach, there is very little enjoyment to be had in their execution, not least because he assails his readers with verbiage at once high-flown and ham-fisted. The Morrison touch—deployed everywhere, endlessly—is to crowd one high concept after another, reverently leaving each alone, never to return to any one idea again.

And finally, hey, all of TCJ will now also be available via Alexander Street Press, which provides digital archives to subscribing institutions.

Once again it must be a short post. More soon!

 

Why Fuss?

Sorry to miss you yesterday. Tim is on vacation and I found myself both without and far away from the Internet. Currently an iPad and 3G are it so this will be a minimal post. But it sure looks like things have been busy around here.

If you’re just tuning in, there’s a ton of new material on the site.

-Nicole Rudick on one of the all-time great comics, Gloriana, by Kevin Huizenga.

-Joe Daly, whose Dungeon Quest series is one of the best and strangest surprises in recent years, was interviewed by Eric Buckler.

-Here’s everyone’s face European, Brecht Evens, live from SDCC.

-Frank Santoro reporting on his one-man comic-con.

-And finally, no week would be complete without Joe McCulloch’s “Week.”

Enjoy.