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Beach Sculpture

Today on the site:

Well, you could help us determine if we’ve set some kind of commenting (or really any kind of) record for the ongoing group therapy session once called a “negotiation”. Or you could better spend your time reading about Percy Crosby and the great comic strip “Skippy.” Here’s an excerpt from the excerpt:

 He learned something else from his keen observations of his parents in the present as well, something that makes its way only quietly around the edges of Skippy. In many ways Skippy Skinner was, as almost every profile of Crosby would insist, a semi-autobiographical portrait of the artist as a young rapscallion. His boss at Life magazine, the legendary artist and editor Charles Dana Gibson, would routinely refer to Crosby as “Skippy himself.” But in some important ways this was not quite the case. Skippy Skinner was the child of a physician, his mother a stylish hostess and socialite. Skippy was raised comfortably in the Protestant Church and his “Americanness” was never in question. Percy Crosby’s childhood was necessarily a more complex story. While Crosby would be largely raised Protestant under his mother’s guidance, Catholicism remained a vital part of the family’s spiritual fabric—not least in the form of the family whose visits so ruffled his mother’s feathers. And of course Percy did not grow up the son of a successful town doctor, but the son of an art supply dealer, one whose economic fortunes were far from stable.

And Mark Siegel takes us through Day 3 of his diary.

Elsewhere:

This is a hilarious account of MorrisonCon (yes, that’s a real thing) last weekend, including crying and evaluations of DC Entertainment staff members circa 1977 1982  2012.

Sean Howe would like to correct some misconceptions about his upcoming (excellent) book Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.

Are you a fan of The Master? Dapper Dan is. If so, you may well appreciate a Richard Corben (You’re welcome, Jeet!) image here.


One Response to Beach Sculpture

  1. Don Druid says:

    I don’t suppose any of us know Grant Morrison at all, or that’s what Grant Morrison has been insisting before, during and after writing entire books about what he thinks, but wouldn’t something crazy expensive called “MorrisonCon” pretty much narrow down the attendees to 1) personal friends and acquaintances of Grant Morrison and 2) the sort of slavish super-fans that Morrison claims to loathe (and not have) in his book?

    In that case, why not just throw another party for your friends?

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