Author Archives: Paul Tumey

About Paul Tumey

Paul Tumey is a writer, artist, and comics historian. He is the creative director of Presentation Tree, a 15-year old business devoted to developing great presentations. He is a co-editor and essayist for THE ART OF RUBE GOLDBERG (Abrams ComicArts - November 2013). He is also a contributing editor and essayist for SOCIETY IS NIX: GLEEFUL ANARCHY AT THE DAWN OF THE AMERICAN NEWSPAPER COMIC STRIP 1895-1915 (Sunday Press - July 2013). Tumey researched and wrote about the cartoonist Harry Tuthill in an introductory essay that was published in THE BUNGLE FAMILY 1930 (Library of American Comics, 2014). Tumey was a contributing editor and essayist for KING OF THE COMICS: 100 YEARS OF KING FEATURES (IDW, 2015). Most recently, Tumey contributed an essay on Dick Tracy to DICK TRACY: COLORFUL CASES OF THE 1930s (Sunday Press, 2016) and co-edited and wrote for FOOLISH QUESTIONS AND OTHER ODD OBSERVATIONS BY RUBE GOLDBERG (Sunday Press, 2017). Tumey has published over forty essays, reviews and interviews in THE COMICS JOURNAL. He has lectured on comics at Parson's The New School (New York City) and the University of Washington. Tumey is currently at work on his own book about the great screwball cartoonists. He lives in Seattle, WA with his wife Claire Mack, two teens, two parakeets, a cat, and several piles of crumbling old paper.

The Seattle Undergound Comics Scene is Alive and Oozing

Seattle has a new underground comics scene. One is tempted to say “again,” recalling the boom of the 1990s with Peter Bagge, Jim Woodring, and the like. More accurately, the scene has endured. Continue reading

 

Rube Goldberg Butts In

Trying to grasp the inexhaustible career of a master. Continue reading

 
Photo: James Gill

Short Run Small Press Fest 2013: Mad Stacks (of Zines)

An on the scene report. Continue reading

 

Figuring Out George Carlson (Part 2)

Further into the career of the great unheralded cartoonist. Continue reading

 

Figuring Out George Carlson (Part 1)

Digging up George Carlson and his extremely busy career. Continue reading

 
A framed image of an evil gangster by comics master Jack Cole

The Lost Comics of Jack Cole – Part 2 (1938)

1938 was the year that Superman appeared. It was also the year that Jack Cole became a comic book artist. Welcome to part two of my continuing survey of the lesser known (and, in some cases, virtually unknown) comics of … Continue reading

 

The Lost Comics of Jack Cole – Part 1 (1931-1937)

A study of Cole’s lesser-known comics and cartoons sheds light on his greatest work, and reshapes our current narrow understanding of this secretive, influential 20th century pop artist. Continue reading