Author Archives: Paul Tumey

About Paul Tumey

Paul Tumey is a writer, artist, and comics historian. He is the creative director of Presentation Tree, a 15-year old business devoted to developing great presentations. He is a co-editor and essayist for THE ART OF RUBE GOLDBERG (Abrams ComicArts – November 2013). He is also a contributing editor and essayist for SOCIETY IS NIX: GLEEFUL ANARCHY AT THE DAWN OF THE AMERICAN NEWSPAPER COMIC STRIP 1895-1915 (Sunday Press – July 2013). Tumey researched and wrote about the cartoonist Harry Tuthill in an introductory essay that was published in THE BUNGLE FAMILY 1930 (Library of American Comics, 2014). Tumey was a contributing editor and essayist for KING OF THE COMICS: 100 YEARS OF KING FEATURES (IDW, 2015). Most recently, Tumey contributed an essay on Dick Tracy to DICK TRACY: COLORFUL CASES OF THE 1930s (Sunday Press, 2016) and co-edited and wrote for FOOLISH QUESTIONS AND OTHER ODD OBSERVATIONS BY RUBE GOLDBERG (Sunday Press, 2017). Tumey has published over forty essays, reviews and interviews in THE COMICS JOURNAL. He has lectured on comics at Parson’s The New School (New York City) and the University of Washington. Tumey is currently at work on his own book about the great screwball cartoonists. He lives in Seattle, WA with his wife Claire Mack, two teens, two parakeets, a cat, and several piles of crumbling old paper.

The Emil Ferris Interview: Monsters, Art and Stories (Part 2)

“She uses the sketchbook idea as a way to change the grammar and syntax of the comics page …” – Art Spiegelman in The New York Times, February 17, 2017 (“First, Emil Ferris Was Paralyzed. Then Her Book Got Lost … Continue reading

 
Emil Ferris

The Emil Ferris Interview: Monsters, Art and Stories (Part 1)

My Favorite Thing is Monsters author Emil Ferris on her life as an artist and her love of monsters. Continue reading

 

Seeking Salivation! Food in Early Comics

University of Washington professor José Alaniz invited me to prepare and deliver a guest lecture on early comics for his class on food-themed comics. You could say I hoped the project would turn out to be something I could sink my teeth into. I was not disappointed. Continue reading

 

A “Konversation” with George Herriman’s Biographer, Michael Tisserand (Part Two)

If one is going to spend ten years on a single subject, George Herriman is a good one. Continue reading

 

A “Konversation” with George Herriman’s Biographer, Michael Tisserand (Part One)

  “Herriman was talking about race and identity — as profoundly as anyone has, in my opinion — but I never see that as his big “Topic.” It was just part of his world, and the world he created, even … Continue reading

 
Gene Ahern 1928 photo

Gene Ahern Covers The Conventions

You might have missed this. Gene Ahern, a popular newspaper cartoonist covered the tense, rancorous presidential nominations by sending Major Hoople, his Our Boarding House comic strip character, to the Republican and Democratic national conventions. It’s understandable if you didn’t … Continue reading

 
Gus Mager 1906 comic strip

The Lost Sundays of Gus Mager (1904-06)

Now, we wind the clock back to 1904 and take a look at what could be called the “lost” Sundays of Gus Mager – three short series that represent fascinating experiments in style and content. Continue reading

 

The Screwball Comics of Gus Mager: Hippos, Monks and Sherlock Holmes

Known primarily for Hawkshaw the Detective, which ran off and on from 1913 through 1947, Mager was a fine cartoonist and accomplished painter associated with the Ashcan School. Continue reading