Author Archives: Frank M. Young

“There Are Just Some Times When You Can’t Deal”: A Previously Unpublished Interview with Harvey Pekar

A never-before-published interview with the late Harvey Pekar, which may have been his last. In it, he discusses collaboration, Israel, and the American Splendor movie. Continue reading

 

“He Was an Odd Individual Who Really Pushed the Boundaries”: An Interview with Bill Schelly about James Warren

The comics scholar talks at length about his career and his new book on publisher James Warren. Continue reading

 

The Enigma of Cecil Jensen, Part Two: Elmo Without Elmo

The later years, when Elmo made way for Little Debbie. Continue reading

 

The Enigma of Cecil Jensen, Part One: The Road to Elmo

An appreciation of the 1940s strip Elmo, which was both ahead of its time and behind the times—possessing the absurd cool of a Nathanael West or S. J. Perelman and droll ensemble comedy reminiscent of Thimble Theater. Continue reading

 

“These Are the Memories We Cherish”: Marriage Wed to Adventure in Buz Sawyer

Though full of stark violence, the triumph of Roy Crane’s Buz Sawyer is a character study that shows the impact of an adventurous life on a down-to-earth marriage. Continue reading

 

Dean Miller: In (and Out) Like Flint

There are hundreds of unknown sob stories in comics. Creators routinely signed away the rights to their original concepts, had their work butchered by heavy-handed editors, and suffered as the comics industry weathered financial upheavals. And that’s just comic books. Newspaper strips are another thing. Continue reading

 

“A Tricky Cad”: The Gravies, Sawdust and Chester Gould

The meta-strips within 1950s and ’60s Dick Tracy. Continue reading

 

An Interview with Yvan Guillo/Samplerman

A quiet revolution in comics—as relates to its connection with fine art and design—is staged on the tumblr of Yvan Guillo, under the pen name of Samplerman. Using castaway imagery from comics—much of it found at free websites like the … Continue reading

 
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