Author Archives: Annie Mok

Tillie Walden

Tillie Walden is a young Texas-based cartoonist who has three graphic novellas from UK’s Avery Hill Publishing to her name (The End of Summer in 2015 and I Love This Part and A City Inside in 2016), as well as her upcoming graphic … Continue reading

 

An Interview with Maré Odomo

A conversation with Maré Odomo, a young Seattle-based cartoonist who’s just released their largest work to date, Late Bloomer. Continue reading

 

“The Starting Point”: An Interview with Julie Doucet

Cars, collage, and reading loud with the Montreal-based artist. Continue reading

 

“To Learn How to Tell That Joke”: An Interview with Eleanor Davis

Checking in with the prolific cartoonist, whose current work includes the publications BDSM, Flop to the Top!, and Libby’s Dad. Continue reading

 

“Comics Was the Reliable Thing”: An Interview with Michael DeForge

Michael DeForge’s new graphic novel, Big Kids, follows the teenaged Adam through a conflict with his cop uncle, a mysterious college-aged stranger named April moving in with him and his family, and a jarring breakup with his jerky boyfriend, which then sparks a traumatic, permanent shift in his PoV. Continue reading

 

“Going to 100”: An Interview with K.L. Ricks

A talk with the New England-based cartoonist, whose eerie, atmospheric comic for Hazlitt, “Country Darkness,” concludes with its third part next month. Continue reading

 

“This Heartbreak Sonata I’ve Been Slowly Composing”: An Interview with Jeremy Sorese

A conversation with Jeremy Sorese, whose first graphic novel, the sci-fi story Curveball, debuted at Comic Arts Brooklyn. Curveball follows Avery, a young genderqueer person who works as a waiter on a cruise ship off of a science-fiction version of Chicago’s tourist-y Navy Pier. Continue reading

 

Funny Angry: An Interview with Jane Mai

Jane Mai’s See You Next Tuesday is a raucous bunch of short comics and scraps. This third book in what appears to be a loose trilogy is lighter and funnier, but allows itself to go deeper and darker as a result. Continue reading